Debt of Honor: Disabled Veterans in American History (2015)

Introduction

Examine the reality of warfare and disability from the perspective of disabled veterans.

Outline

Disabled veterans hold a unique place in the history of veterans in the United States, one that palpably illustrates the human cost of war, and speaks to the enormous sacrifices of military service.

The programme examines the way in which the American government and society as a whole have regarded disabled veterans throughout history, beginning in the aftermath of the Revolutionary War through today’s continuing conflicts in the Middle East.

As advances in field medicine markedly reduce the number of deaths in the battlefield, increased numbers of veterans are coming home with severe injuries. These soldiers carry both visible and invisible scars of war, and their readjustment back into civilian life is often complicated by the psychological trauma and physical wounds sustained in battle. Today, with the United States fighting the longest war in its history, it has become imperative to create a bridge between civilians and soldiers, forging ties with the 1 percent of Americans who comprise the nation’s military.

Debt of Honor seeks to understand the societal perception of soldiers and the wars they fight, exploring the repercussions of the growing divide between civilians and those who serve. Above all, it seeks to build a new bridge between military and civilian cultures in the United States, to inspire an important dialogue about how Americans treat their veterans, and to impart a message of compassion and mutual understanding.

Production & Filming Details

  • Release Date: 10 November 2015 (US).
  • Running Time: 55 minutes.
  • Country: US.
  • Language: English.

YouTube Link

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