Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993): S01E02 – Emissary, Part 02


Introduction

“Emissary” is the two-part series premiere, comprising the pilot and second episodes, of the American science fiction television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Set in the 24th century, the series begins following the adventures on Deep Space Nine, a space station located near a stable wormhole between the Alpha and Gamma quadrants of the Milky Way Galaxy, in orbit of the planet Bajor.

In this episode, Commander Benjamin Sisko (Avery Brooks) and his son Jake (Cirroc Lofton) arrive with Starfleet personnel on the station shortly after Cardassian occupation forces have departed. While working to repair the station and assist the Bajoran people, Starfleet discovers a mysterious wormhole which promises to bring astonishing change to the galaxy.

Outline

Sisko and Dax arrive at the location of the phenomenon and discover the entrance to a stable wormhole leading to the Gamma Quadrant. Thrilled at the discovery, the two attempt to return through the wormhole but become stuck by some force inside it. Sisko and Dax are exploring the strange environment revealed inside the wormhole when Dax is suddenly sent away, appearing moments later on the operations deck of Deep Space Nine, while Sisko remains in a white void.

Dax quickly relates their findings. Kira, recognising the value of the stable wormhole to Bajor’s future, orders the staff to move the station close to the wormhole’s mouth. Gul Dukat, having repaired his sensors, follows the station and discovers the wormhole himself. Dukat enters the wormhole, but when the station’s staff tries to follow, they find the wormhole entrance no longer open. Cardassian ships begin to arrive at the station, questioning the disappearance of Gul Dukat and dismissing the claims of a wormhole. After requesting help from Starfleet, Kira attempts to hold off the Cardassians by altering their sensor reading to make it appear that the station is heavily armed. The Cardassians eventually see through the ruse, and prepare for an assault.

Sisko, in the meantime, finds that he has encountered entities in the wormhole who speak to him through images of his wife, friends, and crew members. The “wormhole aliens” question Sisko’s corporeal and linear existence, and explain that they become disrupted when such beings pass through the wormhole. They become further enraged when Gul Dukat’s ship attempts to pass through, and forcibly close the wormhole and disable the ship. Sisko attempts to explain how his kind thrive on their linear existence, but the entities point out that he continues to return to the moment of Jennifer’s death. Sisko comes to the realisation that he has been grieving over the loss of his wife – literally “living in the past” – and explains this to the wormhole aliens.

The Cardassians begin their attack on Deep Space Nine, but just as the shields fail and Kira prepares to surrender the station, the wormhole opens up again, with Sisko in the runabout towing Gul Dukat’s ship out of it. On Gul Dukat’s orders, the Cardassians stop their attack and depart from the sector. Sisko reveals that he was able to negotiate with the wormhole aliens to keep it open and allow ships to pass through. When the Enterprise arrives in response to Kira’s earlier call for help, Sisko informs Picard that he plans to remain station commander indefinitely.

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Production & Filming Details

  • Director(s): David Carson.
  • Writer(s): Rick Berman and Michael Piller.
  • Release Date: 03 January 1993.
  • Running Time: 45 minutes.
  • Country: US.
  • Language: English.

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